We believe that sexuality is about health, intimacy, desire and protection, and that the knowledge needed to advance and protect one's own sexual health and well-being is vital. We hope to provide accessible information and resources essential for healthy discussion and decision-making about sexuality available on campus.




Are you coming to Ask the Sexpert?
Thursday, Jan. 24
5 pm
Smith 211
If you have questions that you want to submit anonymously, you can send them to our inbox here on tumblr and the panelists will answer them at the event. If you can’t think of questions now you can always ask at the event, either by raising your hand or writing it on a piece of paper and handing it to us!

Are you coming to Ask the Sexpert?

Thursday, Jan. 24

5 pm

Smith 211

If you have questions that you want to submit anonymously, you can send them to our inbox here on tumblr and the panelists will answer them at the event. If you can’t think of questions now you can always ask at the event, either by raising your hand or writing it on a piece of paper and handing it to us!


Is it possible to ask anonymous questions?
by Anonymous

yes, absolutely!


Hi, everyone. Be sure to join us January 24th for our winter quarter edition of Ask the Sexpert! We will have some really awesome panelists this time. 

Hi, everyone. Be sure to join us January 24th for our winter quarter edition of Ask the Sexpert! We will have some really awesome panelists this time. 


fuckyeahfeminists:

While it’s a victory that people over the age of 18 can get EC without a prescription, it only includes people with official identification. This creates another unnecessary barrier to people who need EC. True reproductive justice can only be obtained when we remove barriers for all.

fuckyeahfeminists:

While it’s a victory that people over the age of 18 can get EC without a prescription, it only includes people with official identification. This creates another unnecessary barrier to people who need EC. True reproductive justice can only be obtained when we remove barriers for all.

(via thecsph)


plannedparenthood:

“In a perfect world, you might prefer to never queef, but as it is, you might as well laugh about it.” Read more.

plannedparenthood:

“In a perfect world, you might prefer to never queef, but as it is, you might as well laugh about it.” Read more.


(Source: sexgenderbody, via slutwalkseattle)


projectunbreakable:

The poster reads:
#1 “You’ve been very bad.”
#2 “The way you move, you can’t possibly be a virgin.”
#1  I was 3½ years old.
I had a cut on my head; he was the ER physician on duty.  He ordered my mom and the nurse out of the examining room. They obeyed him; back then, you would never argue with a doctor.  He stitched the cut on my head, then sexually assaulted me. 
I didn’t tell anyone for more than 30 years.
According to some studies, women who were sexually assaulted as children are 2-3 times more likely to be subsequently raped as adults.
#2  I was 19 years old, and a virgin.
He was the only son of a rich and very powerful family, and wasn’t used to being turned down by a nobody like me.  Later, when I told him I was pregnant because of what he did to me, he told me I would have to get an abortion.  I refused; I planned to have the baby and raise him.  He calmly told me that he would drug me, tie me up, and lock me in the trunk of his car, then drive me to another state, where abortion was legal.  He said that his mother knew people on the hospital board there.  His family would pay them to do this to me against my will.  I got away from him and locked myself in my dorm room.  After four days of hiding in terror, I miscarried.
I didn’t talk about any of it for years.  Most of my female friends throughout my life have been sexually assaulted. We mostly don’t talk about it. We’re blamed, not believed, punished, and pathologized for it.  But I’m talking about it now.  As the historian Howard Zinn said, “The most revolutionary act one can engage in is to tell the truth.”
Today I’m a psychologist who treats survivors of trauma, including sexual abuse and rape.  As a professor, I teach courses for doctoral students on how to help trauma survivors and advocate against interpersonal violence.  Almost 100 male and female therapists in training have taken my classes in the last 6 years.
—
Photographed in Chicago, IL on September 27th
—
Click here to learn more about Project Unbreakable. (trigger warning)
Facebook, Twitter, submissions, FAQ, donate to Project Unbreakable
Join our mailing list! Email kaelyn@project-unbreakable.org with the subject line “Newsletter” to be the first to hear about our two exciting announcements.

projectunbreakable:

The poster reads:

#1 “You’ve been very bad.”

#2 “The way you move, you can’t possibly be a virgin.”

#1  I was 3½ years old.

I had a cut on my head; he was the ER physician on duty.  He ordered my mom and the nurse out of the examining room. They obeyed him; back then, you would never argue with a doctor.  He stitched the cut on my head, then sexually assaulted me. 

I didn’t tell anyone for more than 30 years.


According to some studies, women who were sexually assaulted as children are 2-3 times more likely to be subsequently raped as adults.

#2  I was 19 years old, and a virgin.

He was the only son of a rich and very powerful family, and wasn’t used to being turned down by a nobody like me.  Later, when I told him I was pregnant because of what he did to me, he told me I would have to get an abortion.  I refused; I planned to have the baby and raise him.  He calmly told me that he would drug me, tie me up, and lock me in the trunk of his car, then drive me to another state, where abortion was legal.  He said that his mother knew people on the hospital board there.  His family would pay them to do this to me against my will.  I got away from him and locked myself in my dorm room.  After four days of hiding in terror, I miscarried.

I didn’t talk about any of it for years.  Most of my female friends throughout my life have been sexually assaulted. We mostly don’t talk about it. We’re blamed, not believed, punished, and pathologized for it.  But I’m talking about it now.  As the historian Howard Zinn said, “The most revolutionary act one can engage in is to tell the truth.”


Today I’m a psychologist who treats survivors of trauma, including sexual abuse and rape.  As a professor, I teach courses for doctoral students on how to help trauma survivors and advocate against interpersonal violence.  Almost 100 male and female therapists in training have taken my classes in the last 6 years.

Photographed in Chicago, IL on September 27th

Click here to learn more about Project Unbreakable. (trigger warning)

FacebookTwittersubmissionsFAQdonate to Project Unbreakable

Join our mailing list! Email kaelyn@project-unbreakable.org with the subject line “Newsletter” to be the first to hear about our two exciting announcements.

(via slutwalkseattle)


"Of course, not all women of color are sexualized in the same way. For example, while black women are considered lascivious, always consenting and out of control, Latina women are considered exotic or overly sensual and Asian women are considered childish and prude. These particular stereotypes are reinforced through popular culture and pornography (just Google respectively “Asian women,” “black women,” or “Latina women” and then “women” and see what comes up). The common thread here is that nonwhite women’s sexuality is seen as outside the norm of white heterosexuality. It’s therefore something to be uniquely desired, manipulated, exploited, or controlled. Within this rather toxic climate, being a woman of color who’s in touch with her sexuality is an act of resistance. Pushing past the negative media depictions and still finding a healthy, healing, erotic, and functional sexuality is no small feat."

Samhita Mukhopadhyay

(via wretchedoftheearth)

(via slutwalkseattle)

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